Returned 75 result(s) for "bitters"; page 2 of 5.
It's almost common sense to bring blueberries to a margarita, this recipe has been designed by many folks that have a handful of fresh bluerberries, we just substitute mezcal over tequila to get a nice smokey finish
Notes:
A lightly sweet blueberry with a tart sour finish that lingers with smoke
We found absolutely no reference to where this cocktail could have come from but we guess someone was playing with the concept of the pina colada and mai tai when working on this design.
Notes:
On the sweeter side, with lots of coconut and pina colada flavor with a warm rum finish.
The Brooklyn is like a standard manhattan in recipe design, but created more dry by using a dry vermouth instead; Not too unlike how a dry martini and standard martini are cousins. Over the years the manhattan dominated the scene and the Brooklyn died away.
Notes:
A dry forward flavor with a subtle rye to add a mild sweetness, the maraschino liqueur is quite muted but ties the flavors together.
A great new years even cocktail for those that want to experience champagne a bit differently from normal.
Notes:
Champagne forward with slight nuance of allspice, cinnamon and clove.
Not to be confused with the single-word form of the “Southside”, the Chicago South Side is a similar variation that brings Angostura into the mix. Unlike the Southside, however, this cocktail calls for lime juice over lemon juice and London Dry Gin over American Gin.
Notes:
Lovely aromatic flavor of trade spices, gin botanicals and acidity. Just a great drink.
A Portland OR cocktail from the Driftwood Room that is a riff off the classic manhattan.
Notes:
A smokey and spicy version of the manhattan with a bit of additional bitterness.
cocktail by Jayce Kadyschuk, the head bartender at Clive’s in Victoria, British Columbia.
In 1959 he came up with a couple hangover remedies which he called Dying Bastard and Dead Bastard while working at the Marco Polo Club in Manhattan.
Notes:
Light/muted combination of bourbon and spicy ginger that remains light and refreshing. Not as bourbon-flavored as the dying bastard recipe.
This cocktail was designed by Disaronno to promote their Cavalli partnership in which the Amaretto bottle was re-designed in the style of Roberto Cavalli.
Notes:
Sweet flavor of disaronno meets prosecco with a beautiful trade spice profile of bitters.
In 1959 Joe Scialom came up with a couple hangover remedies which he called Dying Bastard and Dead Bastard while working at the Marco Polo Club in Manhattan. These would be variations to the suffering bastard.
Notes:
Great combination of bourbon and spicy ginger that remains light and refreshing while carrying a bit of alcohol.
Carl Brown's herbal creation which is a variation on the traditional gin gimlet, we make it with real sour not lime concentrate.
Notes:
Herbal dill, mild sour and floral gin components mingled together in a symphony of flavor
The east side, a play off the 'south side' cocktail and still remains a gin based drink.
Notes:
Great cucumber flavor with mild mint structure with just enough gin botanicals to keep it complex yet fun.
Filed In:
This is no doubt an Irish version of a manhattan that would work well for your next St. Patrick's Day party if you've got an audience that appreciates a manhattan.
Notes:
Lots of orange/citrus notes with a hint bitterness and sweet with a light fortified wine, but very little aggressive whiskey-forward flavor.
Created by Sasha Petraske for John Dory Oyster Bar in New York City, this cocktail is probably a representation of daylight saving time, falling back to shorter darker days, where you need some warmth to help you survive.
Notes:
A balance between sweet and bitter with a rye whiskey profile.
Filed In:
A cocktail invented by Colin Nugent--what we need are more mezcal cocktails and this one brings some bitterness into the picture.
Royal Rose Real Sour Mix