Returned 75 result(s) for "bitters"; page 4 of 5.
The mimosa was said to be invented by Frank Meier in 1925. It's said to be named after the yellow flower by the same name common in Europe.
Notes:
A light and refreshing dry champagne and citrus experience.
First published in1948 as part of David Embury’s “The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks.", this drink is a riff off the traditional manhattan, but substituting benedictine for vermouth; there is no known origin or author for this classic recipe.
Notes:
Light notes of honey meets spicy notes of rye for a delicious balance
With the origin Hotel Nacional, this drink is based in Cuba -- Havana, specifically, but so many daiquiri designs can be created off the original. This recipe was modified by Jeffrey Morgenthaler
Notes:
Warm rum and citrus with a hint of peach in the finish; great balance of sweet against sour.
Jeffrey Morgenthaler design for those of us that want a fall seasonal cocktail that doesn't get pumpkin spice all up in your face
Notes:
Moderately bitter, mildly herbal, and dry finish
The Nui Nui balances allspice, clove, cinnamon and other trade spices for a great introduction tiki drink for new and old cocktail enthusiasts.
Notes:
Flavorful balance of allspice, clove, and cinnamon, on the sweeter side of tiki.
Filed In:
Pronounced "wah-hock-en" Dead, this cocktail is a play on words from the comic book / tv series and has a great use of Mezcal
Notes:
Smokey Sweet Candy (aka "nana candy"); easy to drink, slightly unique flavor profile that's hard to pickup. Great smoky profile and sweeter flavors.
The Oaxacan Jewel was created by one of our community members and is a take on the Bijou cocktail, but with Mezcal!
Notes:
High potency with accents of herbs, black licorice, and a hint of smoke in the finish.
Potentially the first cocktail that started it all, the old fashioned is a simple drink that dates to around 1850, first published in 1860. Our recipe is the original old fashioned, no muddled fruit or cherries, just the raw basics.
Notes:
Forward rye flavor with muted bitters; simple.
The Pearl Diver is a Donn Beachcomber original that was rediscovered by Jeff Berry after finding a notebook of former Donn Beach Maitre d’, Dick Santiago. Historical search, decoding, and publishing this hidden gem of a cocktail.
Notes:
Coconut, allspice, nutmeg, citrus and a bit of rich rum greets your senses with every sip
The Pearl Harbor is one of the only vodka cocktails we enjoy, it's like a Melon Ball but using pineapple juice over orange juice. Might not be classic, but a worthy contender.
Notes:
Pineapple and melon flavor profile with a refreshing moderate sweetness
What makes the perfect manhattan so perfect? The use of dry vermouth, much like a perfect martini. If you think a manhattan is too sweet, cutting it with dry vermouth can indeed make it more perfect.
Notes:
Rye forward flavor that has a bit of a sweet mid-palate that ends slightly off dry, without as much sweet finish.
A cocktail design of Peruvian origin, often seen in Chili, Peru and other South American countries. Like most core spirits, even a Pisco needs a sour design.
Notes:
Light, dry with citrus and grape-like flavor
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Suggested to be originally published in the New York Times in 1908, a recipe from Jamaica, this "punch" has a wide variety of recipe designs, we happen to like this one because it's well crafted and tasty with pool side tropical appeal.
Notes:
Foamy Fruity flavors mingled with molasses forward dark rum with a juicy tropical loveliness.
A spicy and smokey cocktail that riff's off a margarita designed "sour" with heat, smoke and spice!
Notes:
Smoke and spice meets a juicy dry flavor that lingers with more heat and smoke. A blend of tequila and mezcal flavor.
This cocktail is designed by San Francisco bartender Jon Santer who apparently loves spirit-forward spicy rye cocktails because this will hit you like a... revolver.
Notes:
Spirit forward, coffee with a blast of rye whiskey right up in your face.
Royal Rose Real Sour Mix