Returned 49 result(s) for "gin"; page 3 of 4.
The traditional long island iced tea, designed with "five whites" mingled with sour mix and cola.
Notes:
Powerful and potent with a bit of a citrus tea flavor
A cocktail design by Jennifer Schommer, created to riff-off the Dorchester cocktail, but in our home city of Manchester, NH.
Notes:
Sweet and tart grapefruit, zesty citrus and lingering juniper notes; finishes dry and tart.
The Martinez was either the father to the Martini, a cousin to the Martini, a variation, or just a drink created around the same time period. Both the Martini and the Martinez were born between 1860 and 1870 as vermouth became more popular in the United States.
Notes:
Stong potent start mixed with orange and subtle juniper with a mid-palate and finish that lingers bitter, tart and powerful.
The Campari is a well known cocktail for those that like bitter drinks and, because it's easy to remember. Very few variations exist for this 1:1:1 drink design.
Notes:
Very bitter cocktail with a strong alcohol-forward flavor profile. A lingering bitter bite.
Created in 1888 by Henry Charles “Carl” Ramos at the Imperial Cabinet Saloon in New Orleans. This drink is synonymous with New Orleans, and is supposed to be shaken for 12 to 15 minutes. This raises the price at the bar and consumes a lot of bartender time.
Notes:
Pure herbal gin and citrus forward flavor and aroma
Filed In:
We discovered this cocktail for our fall seasonal drinks, we believe the credit goes to a husband-and-wife team in Seattle by the name of Jason and Nicole Wilson.
Notes:
Vibrant berry, and aromatic floral flavor that reminds us a bit of the smell of a holiday candle.
The Salty Dog was invented by George Jessel in 1952. George is the same individual that brought us the well known Bloody Mary cocktail. Given the date of the Salty Dog’s creation, we would not be surprised to find that the original called for vodka over gin.
Notes:
Light flavor of juniper and lightly tart fleshy grapefruit flavor.
The very first Singapore Sling recipe said to have been created by Ngiam Tong Boon is lost to time. Not even the Raffles Hotel, who has been serving it since 1915 or so, has the original recipe–they add “this or that” as Jeff Berry says in his book.
Notes:
Tropical flavors of almond, brown sugar, cherry, pineapple and an array of sweetness.
The "fizz" has existed since 1887 when Jerry Thomas penned his fizz recipes; one can technically turn anything into a fizz, even sloe berry gin, so here you go...a recipe dating to the 1880's with a spirit that matches it in age.
Notes:
Dry berry flavor, brown sugar with a light off-dry and tart finish.
This falls into the family of cocktails with the "slow comfortable screw" naming convention. When created with fresh orange juice, you've go a lovely lightly sweet breakfast cocktail, add galliano and you've got an "up against the wall" recipe.
Notes:
Taste like freshly squeezed orange juice with a twang of southern comfort sweetness.
An interesting cocktail that feels like it may be a riff on a Singapore Sling of sorts.
Notes:
A light bitter aperol, a flavorful sweet passion fruit, light tart, lots of flavors going on
The Southside cocktail has a murky history and a confusing origin city. Is “southside” referring to New York or Chicago? It has also been called “a mint julep with gin” and Dale Degroff says it’s a variation on a cocktail called the Major Bailey which uses both lemon and lime.
Notes:
A sour-forward gin flavored design with subtle mint flavor.
Suffering Bastard as designed in Cairo at Shepheard's by Joe Scialom in 1942. This is one of three variations of the suffering bastard series (the original). Follow on's include the dead and dying bastard.
Notes:
Light and refreshing zing of ginger with mellow island spice and muted alcohols.
This fantastic cocktail doesn’t have a rich deep history. We believe this was created (or at least documented) by Charles Phan’s Slanted Door.
Notes:
Floral forward herbal flavor, mid-palate citrus acidity, finishing of juniper, sweet herbaceous linger.
The Last Word has a mythical history that begins around 1916 with many folks claiming its creation or its bar menu addition, including the Detroit Athletic club and others. It was brought back to life in 2003 by Murray Stenson when he discovered it in an old cocktail book. He served it at the Zig Zag Cafe.
Notes:
A balanced herbal forward cocktail that doesn't lean towards sour, and has hints of sweetness.
Royal Rose Real Sour Mix