Returned 13 result(s) for "rye"; page 1 of 1.
The 12 mile limit is a prohibition era cocktail that was named after the 12 mile distance at sea you had to be at to drink alcohol during the Volstead Act.
Notes:
Dry, sour citrus taste, a bit of rye without being too sweet. No real brandy impact seems to stand out.
Filed In:
While there is no real history behind this drink, nor do we know whom created it, this cocktail came across our desk and we just had to make it.
Notes:
Dry and acidic, not too sweet, but all the flavors pair well together without anything overpowering; a bit of molasses/blackstrap, musty rye and hard to put down.
Exploring more neighborhoods of New York City, the Bensonhurst is a riff off the standard manhattan cocktail.
Notes:
A manhattan with an herbal bitter bite, similar to the bitter of a negroni.
The Brooklyn is like a standard manhattan in recipe design, but created more dry by using a dry vermouth instead; Not too unlike how a dry martini and standard martini are cousins. Over the years the manhattan dominated the scene and the Brooklyn died away.
Notes:
A dry forward flavor with a subtle rye to add a mild sweetness, the maraschino liqueur is quite muted but ties the flavors together.
Created by Sasha Petraske for John Dory Oyster Bar in New York City, this cocktail is probably a representation of daylight saving time, falling back to shorter darker days, where you need some warmth to help you survive.
Notes:
A balance between sweet and bitter with a rye whiskey profile.
Filed In:
Another neighborhood cocktail with rye, that riff's off the manhattan and all those other manhattan variations, this cocktail brings "green" in the form of chartreuse
Notes:
Nice smooth rye flavor with a nuanced herbal sweetness and only a mild / slight vermouth finish.
Potentially the first cocktail that started it all, the old fashioned is a simple drink that dates to around 1850, first published in 1860. Our recipe is the original old fashioned, no muddled fruit or cherries, just the raw basics.
Notes:
Forward rye flavor with muted bitters; simple.
What makes the perfect manhattan so perfect? The use of dry vermouth, much like a perfect martini. If you think a manhattan is too sweet, cutting it with dry vermouth can indeed make it more perfect.
Notes:
Rye forward flavor that has a bit of a sweet mid-palate that ends slightly off dry, without as much sweet finish.
A manhattan variation based on the neighborhood in Brooklyn New York City, that brings rye whiskey together with slight variations of fortified wine, using Punt e Mes instead.
Notes:
A spicy manhattan with similar sweetness and the herbaceous maraschino flavor and muted bitterness; alcohol-forward flavor of rye.
Charles H. Baker’s “The Gentleman’s Companion: Being an Exotic Drinking Book or Around the World with Jigger, Beaker and Flask”, first published in 1939.
Notes:
A cherry flavored manhattan, lightly sweeter with a bit more defining cherry/brown sugar subtlety. A bit of spicy rye and fortified wine flavor.
This cocktail is designed by San Francisco bartender Jon Santer who apparently loves spirit-forward spicy rye cocktails because this will hit you like a... revolver.
Notes:
Spirit forward, coffee with a blast of rye whiskey right up in your face.
The Sazerac went through many variations as Antoine Amedie Peychaud experimented with remedies that used his bitters. In 1838 it used French Brandy and by 1873 it was using American Rye. It moved from Absinthe to Herbsainte and other slight variations. All great cocktails change with time.
Notes:
Spicy rye with a backend hint of anise/fennel and a slight sweetness.
The Trinidad sour is a great use of angostura bitters in high degree, this drink's core "spirit" is bitters and that is pretty unusual.
Notes:
Bitter clove, allspice, nutmeg and other trade spices with just the right amount of balance
Liber & Co Grenadine