Returned 29 result(s) for "whiskey"; page 2 of 2.
Apparently this 1870's cocktail was first called the Continental Sour and eventually Southern Whiskey Sour before finally being dubbed the New York Sour.
Notes:
Smooth flavor, dry finish. Lightly fruity red wine against oak-driven flavor profile with a nice acidity.
Potentially the first cocktail that started it all, the old fashioned is a simple drink that dates to around 1850, first published in 1860. Our recipe is the original old fashioned, no muddled fruit or cherries, just the raw basics.
Notes:
Forward rye flavor with muted bitters; simple.
The paper plane is one of the only cocktails that utilizes a folded airplane for its garnish and is a riff off the Last Word
Notes:
a rollercoaster ride of flavor, a sweet start, a grapefruit mid-plate with a bitter bite that focuses on aperol and amaro nonino with little bourbon and an off-dry finish.
What makes the perfect manhattan so perfect? The use of dry vermouth, much like a perfect martini. If you think a manhattan is too sweet, cutting it with dry vermouth can indeed make it more perfect.
Notes:
Rye forward flavor that has a bit of a sweet mid-palate that ends slightly off dry, without as much sweet finish.
A rare whiskey based tiki cocktail designed by Sandro Conti from 1961. A whiskey sour meets passion fruit.
A manhattan variation based on the neighborhood in Brooklyn New York City, that brings rye whiskey together with slight variations of fortified wine, using Punt e Mes instead.
Notes:
A spicy manhattan with similar sweetness and the herbaceous maraschino flavor and muted bitterness; alcohol-forward flavor of rye.
Charles H. Baker’s “The Gentleman’s Companion: Being an Exotic Drinking Book or Around the World with Jigger, Beaker and Flask”, first published in 1939.
Notes:
A cherry flavored manhattan, lightly sweeter with a bit more defining cherry/brown sugar subtlety. A bit of spicy rye and fortified wine flavor.
This cocktail is designed by San Francisco bartender Jon Santer who apparently loves spirit-forward spicy rye cocktails because this will hit you like a... revolver.
Notes:
Spirit forward, coffee with a blast of rye whiskey right up in your face.
The Sazerac went through many variations as Antoine Amedie Peychaud experimented with remedies that used his bitters. In 1838 it used French Brandy and by 1873 it was using American Rye. It moved from Absinthe to Herbsainte and other slight variations. All great cocktails change with time.
Notes:
Spicy rye with a backend hint of anise/fennel and a slight sweetness.
This falls into the family of cocktails with the "slow comfortable screw" naming convention. When created with fresh orange juice, you've go a lovely lightly sweet breakfast cocktail, add galliano and you've got an "up against the wall" recipe.
Notes:
Taste like freshly squeezed orange juice with a twang of southern comfort sweetness.
The Trinidad sour is a great use of angostura bitters in high degree, this drink's core "spirit" is bitters and that is pretty unusual.
Notes:
Bitter clove, allspice, nutmeg and other trade spices with just the right amount of balance
A century old recipe design, great for the warm months and easy because you can make up your ingredients. You can find recipes with similar ingredients dating back to Jerry Thomas’ 1862 How to Mix Drinks, or, The Bon Vivant’s Companion but not by name "Whiskey Smash."
Notes:
Warm buttery oak, citrus, mint, light touch of vanilla notes in the finish. Whiskey brand dictates profile.
The whiskey sour, a basic sour cocktail ratio with your favorite whiskey, could also be considered a 'Boston Sour' with the inclusion of egg white.
Notes:
A mingling of citrus and whiskey and a silky smooth texture that ends off-dry.
A cocktail design by Jennifer Schommer, created for the Moscow Mule company's 75h Anniversary MuleHead recipe book
Notes:
Smoky and oaky sage and refreshing chilled spicy ginger zing.
Liber & Co Grenadine