Returned 10 result(s) for "Club Soda"; page 1 of 1.
A softer version of a Negroni, something to introduce a person to campari without being overly bitter. First served in the 1860s at Gaspare Campari's bar in Milan, Italy. Found in Casino Royale as well.
Notes:
A bitter cocktail yet the club soda brings down the campari intensity and gives it a refreshing quality.
This cocktail works best in a barrel tiki mug because it fits the motif; This design is from the Mai Kai Restaurant, one of the Historic Places in Florida, best tiki bar in the world says some fans.
Notes:
Sweet and smooth passion fruit tartness with a mild sour and a good balance of sweet flavor, doesn't feel like four ounces of alcohol. Like a passion fruit lemonade.
This drink is made differently in many locations, including the Donn Beachcomber's own locations (circa 1953). However club soda was a late edition added by Jeff Berry in his book vs. the original recipe which called for a blender and crushed ice.
Notes:
Lemonade and Good & Plenty candy, a light and refreshing sour against black licorice
The original Gin Fizz recipe was published in 1862 by Jerry Thomas, The Bartender’s Guide: How To Mix Drinks. Similar to that of a Gin Fix but with less ice and more fizz (carbonation).
Notes:
Smooth and silky lemon flavor with muted notes of juniper and a dry finish
The Mezcal fizz is out of the book of the Dead Rabbit in New York City, because it calls for watermelon juice, it's no doubt a late spring, early summer cocktail.
Notes:
A bit of hot spice that simmers, a bit of smoke, flavorful watermelon, but not sweet.
A breakfast cocktail or night cap, the mind eraser is a design for those looking to loose their inhibitions.
Notes:
Bitter coffee bite. Maybe some sweetness if you try to imagine it.
A classic cocktail born out of Havana Cuba that has survived for almost one hundred years. This old classic is still requested at bars, pool parties and resorts.
Notes:
Light and refreshing sweet mint and sour lime bite with a light rum backend flavor.
The "fizz" has existed since 1887 when Jerry Thomas penned his fizz recipes; one can technically turn anything into a fizz, even sloe berry gin, so here you go...a recipe dating to the 1880's with a spirit that matches it in age.
Notes:
Dry berry flavor, brown sugar with a light off-dry and tart finish.
Jerry Thomas turned this prank cocktail into reality in 1876’s The Bar-Tenders Guide (page 91) in which Thomas references the Tom Collins as a Whiskey, Brandy or Gin cocktail by simply changing out the core ingredient in this sour.
Notes:
Refreshing yet sour start with a mildly sweet tart gin ending with bubbly citrus and a lingering sour lemon
The Vodka Collins is a variation of the earlier Tom Collins by simply removing Old Tom Gin and replacing it with vodka. Difford’s Guide suggests that Vodka Collins cocktails were being served in 1933 after the repeal of prohibition.
Notes:
Light and refreshing lemonade like appeal, with a kick of alcohol in the finish.
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