Returned 52 result(s) for "Simple syrup"; page 3 of 4.
Apparently this 1870's cocktail was first called the Continental Sour and eventually Southern Whiskey Sour before finally being dubbed the New York Sour.
Notes:
Smooth flavor, dry finish. Lightly fruity red wine against oak-driven flavor profile with a nice acidity.
A spicy seranno cocktail created by Ram at Boy Drinks World for his awesome Seranno Cocktail Spice bitters, not and spicy with a good balance!
Notes:
Margarita-like flavor with a spicy backend fire with a lingering yet mild bitter finish
A cocktail design of Peruvian origin, often seen in Chili, Peru and other South American countries. Like most core spirits, even a Pisco needs a sour design.
Notes:
Light, dry with citrus and grape-like flavor
Filed In:
Suggested to be originally published in the New York Times in 1908, a recipe from Jamaica, this "punch" has a wide variety of recipe designs, we happen to like this one because it's well crafted and tasty with pool side tropical appeal.
Notes:
Foamy Fruity flavors mingled with molasses forward dark rum with a juicy tropical loveliness.
A spicy and smokey cocktail that riff's off a margarita designed "sour" with heat, smoke and spice!
Notes:
Smoke and spice meets a juicy dry flavor that lingers with more heat and smoke. A blend of tequila and mezcal flavor.
Created in 1888 by Henry Charles “Carl” Ramos at the Imperial Cabinet Saloon in New Orleans. This drink is synonymous with New Orleans, and is supposed to be shaken for 12 to 15 minutes. This raises the price at the bar and consumes a lot of bartender time.
Notes:
Pure herbal gin and citrus forward flavor and aroma
Filed In:
The Rattlesnake, a cocktail that resembles a rye whiskey sour (or Boston sour) with a bit of absinthe.
Notes:
Rye whiskey spice, black licorice with an off-dry finish.
We discovered this cocktail for our fall seasonal drinks, we believe the credit goes to a husband-and-wife team in Seattle by the name of Jason and Nicole Wilson.
Notes:
Vibrant berry, and aromatic floral flavor that reminds us a bit of the smell of a holiday candle.
The "fizz" has existed since 1887 when Jerry Thomas penned his fizz recipes; one can technically turn anything into a fizz, even sloe berry gin, so here you go...a recipe dating to the 1880's with a spirit that matches it in age.
Notes:
Dry berry flavor, brown sugar with a light off-dry and tart finish.
This cocktail, created by Liz Martinez at the Purple Pig showcases what you can do with a "sour" cocktail while keeping with the Mezcal trend. This drink explains why Mezcal is a versatile spirit.
Notes:
A dry citrus flavor, a good blend of smoke and sour that lingers; a slight hint of herbal bitterness in the mid-palate.
The Southside cocktail has a murky history and a confusing origin city. Is “southside” referring to New York or Chicago? It has also been called “a mint julep with gin” and Dale Degroff says it’s a variation on a cocktail called the Major Bailey which uses both lemon and lime.
Notes:
A sour-forward gin flavored design with subtle mint flavor.
Dale Degroff designs a cocktail that takes advantage of apple cider and we cannot argue. Invented at the Silver Leaf Tavern in NY.
Notes:
A zing of ginger with a nice apple flavor profile with just a hint of rum character.
The Strawberry Daiquiri is a well known blended variation of a traditional daiquiri; there are many strawberry daiquiri recipe designs, we just want the good ones.
Notes:
Sweet strawberries and a light sour lime with a cold refreshing taste.
This fantastic cocktail doesn’t have a rich deep history. We believe this was created (or at least documented) by Charles Phan’s Slanted Door.
Notes:
Floral forward herbal flavor, mid-palate citrus acidity, finishing of juniper, sweet herbaceous linger.
Named after the Raymond Chandler novel, created by Heather Sang , Clyde Common , Portland, Oregon.
Notes:
Dry citrus zing with a bitter bite and a lingering smoke.
Peychaud's Bitters