Returned 61 result(s) for "bitters"; page 4 of 5.
What makes the perfect manhattan so perfect? The use of dry vermouth, much like a perfect martini. If you think a manhattan is too sweet, cutting it with dry vermouth can indeed make it more perfect.
Notes:
Rye forward flavor that has a bit of a sweet mid-palate that ends slightly off dry, without as much sweet finish.
A cocktail design of Peruvian origin, often seen in Chili, Peru and other South American countries. Like most core spirits, even a Pisco needs a sour design.
Notes:
Light, dry with citrus and grape-like flavor
Filed In:
Suggested to be originally published in the New York Times in 1908, a recipe from Jamaica, this "punch" has a wide variety of recipe designs, we happen to like this one because it's well crafted and tasty with pool side tropical appeal.
Notes:
Foamy Fruity flavors mingled with molasses forward dark rum with a juicy tropical loveliness.
A spicy and smokey cocktail that riff's off a margarita designed "sour" with heat, smoke and spice!
Notes:
Smoke and spice meets a juicy dry flavor that lingers with more heat and smoke. A blend of tequila and mezcal flavor.
This cocktail is designed by San Francisco bartender Jon Santer who apparently loves spirit-forward spicy rye cocktails because this will hit you like a... revolver.
Notes:
Spirit forward, coffee with a blast of rye whiskey right up in your face.
Invented at the Waldorf Astoria in New York City, this 19th century artwork is a riff off the manhattan. It's simply a manhattan with scotch.
Notes:
Spirit forward flavor, lots of scotch comes through from start to finish; slight peaty smoke (or heavy if you use an Islay Scotch)
Nick Brown created this cocktail, which no doubt looks a little fancier if you dash all your bitters on top instead of fully integrating; this is a riff off the Mai Tai as it uses rye instead of rum and lemon instead of lime, but fits the "coming into spring" feeling
Notes:
Almond, cinnamon, trade spices and a finish of lightly sweet rye whiskey
The Sazerac went through many variations as Antoine Amedie Peychaud experimented with remedies that used his bitters. In 1838 it used French Brandy and by 1873 it was using American Rye. It moved from Absinthe to Herbsainte and other slight variations. All great cocktails change with time.
Notes:
Spicy rye with a backend hint of anise/fennel and a slight sweetness.
The Shy Sour is a cross between a margarita and an amaretto sour -- designed by M. Carrie Allan
Notes:
Light sour with a touch of almond sweetness followed by a mild smoke and saline finish.
The very first Singapore Sling recipe said to have been created by Ngiam Tong Boon is lost to time. Not even the Raffles Hotel, who has been serving it since 1915 or so, has the original recipe–they add “this or that” as Jeff Berry says in his book.
Notes:
Tropical flavors of almond, brown sugar, cherry, pineapple and an array of sweetness.
Suffering Bastard as designed in Cairo at Shepheard's by Joe Scialom in 1942. This is one of three variations of the suffering bastard series (the original). Follow on's include the dead and dying bastard.
Notes:
Light and refreshing zing of ginger with mellow island spice and muted alcohols.
There are many varieties of 'sundowner' recipes out there, so we are not sure what the historic significance is on this drink. But, we like the play of campari meets mezcal.
Notes:
Smokey mezcal up front, bitter in the back with a little tequila sunrise like flavor profile.
The history behind this dates back to the first category of 'sour' and has been modified a bit to be more interesting and fun. This fits more of a "Boston Sour" (whiskey sour with egg white) but with Tequila and sugar/citrus/bitters that pair against the flavor of tequila.
A cocktail named for a character in the movie Chocolat, but no real cocktail history.
Notes:
A light chocolate hint against a nice whiskey flavor that leads to a spicy bite in the finish
The Trinidad sour is a great use of angostura bitters in high degree, this drink's core "spirit" is bitters and that is pretty unusual.
Notes:
Bitter clove, allspice, nutmeg and other trade spices with just the right amount of balance
Royal Rose Real Sour Mix