Returned 48 result(s) for "bitters"; page 1 of 4.
A long island iced tea without the tequila, but with an inclusion of bitters and measured soda.
Notes:
Drawing potency of spirits combined, with a bit more mild sweetness.
The concept of the 50/50 was to go into the opposite direction of a "dry martini", which is to use less dry vermouth. So, to make your martini less dry you had more dry vermouth to counter your dry gin. Yet, this still isn't sweet.
Notes:
Vermouth forward blast of flavor, very spirit forward and "boozy."
Filed In:
This herbal cocktail feels and tastes like a prohibition style drink but we feel it probably was invented many years later. We couldn't find any good history for it.
Notes:
Herbal flavors of eucalyptus, fennel, a bit of citrus that's not too alcohol-forward; not too unlike a sweeter sazerac.
An old fashioned riff off the standard old fashioned with añejo tequila.
Notes:
Oak aged tequila mingled with spice, pepper and a touch of sweet agave
Fruit brandy's have been popular for years, but usually they play a subtle role in a cocktail. The apricot sour plays a central role in this beverage.
Notes:
Starts sweet, ends off-dry and has a lovely mouth feel; well balanced and tasty.
This cocktail was designed by Derrick and Jennifer Schommer of Common Man Cocktails with the goal of integrating an anejo tequila into a springy yet spicy and sweet tart cocktail design.
Notes:
A spicy ginger zing, a spicy bite of mole flavor and smooth tequila with a nice balance of sweet and tart, slight tiki tropic flavor.
We couldn't find any history on this, but we guess the screwdriver nature is the use of orange juice combined with a core spirit (rum) to make an excellent flavored cocktail.
Notes:
Brown sugar, slight bitterness, allspice with a little rum flavor in the finish.
While there is no real history behind this drink, nor do we know whom created it, this cocktail came across our desk and we just had to make it.
Notes:
Dry and acidic, not too sweet, but all the flavors pair well together without anything overpowering; a bit of molasses/blackstrap, musty rye and hard to put down.
This cocktail works best in a barrel tiki mug because it fits the motif; This design is from the Mai Kai Restaurant, one of the Historic Places in Florida, best tiki bar in the world says some fans.
Notes:
Sweet and smooth passion fruit tartness with a mild sour and a good balance of sweet flavor, doesn't feel like four ounces of alcohol. Like a passion fruit lemonade.
We're not sure if this cocktail has any real relation to Betsy Ross and her friend Washington (and being the first to make the American Flag), but we have heard its first publishing was around 1941.
Notes:
A boozy number that combines flavors of cognac and port, leaning on the sweet side of potent alcohol-forward flavor. Look for dry curacao / orange liqueur to keep down the sweet notes.
Filed In:
The Bloody Mary’s original history isn’t very clear, but there have been a few folks that lay claim to its creation. Harry’s New York Bar in Paris believes they are the place the Bloody Mary was first invented in around 1921.
We found absolutely no reference to where this cocktail could have come from but we guess someone was playing with the concept of the pina colada and mai tai when working on this design.
Notes:
On the sweeter side, with lots of coconut and pina colada flavor with a warm rum finish.
The Brooklyn is like a standard manhattan in recipe design, but created more dry by using a dry vermouth instead; Not too unlike how a dry martini and standard martini are cousins. Over the years the manhattan dominated the scene and the Brooklyn died away.
Notes:
A dry forward flavor with a subtle rye to add a mild sweetness, the maraschino liqueur is quite muted but ties the flavors together.
Not to be confused with the single-word form of the “Southside”, the Chicago South Side is a similar variation that brings Angostura into the mix. Unlike the Southside, however, this cocktail calls for lime juice over lemon juice and London Dry Gin over American Gin.
Notes:
Lovely aromatic flavor of trade spices, gin botanicals and acidity. Just a great drink.
A Portland OR cocktail from the Driftwood Room that is a riff off the classic manhattan.
Notes:
A smokey and spicy version of the manhattan with a bit of additional bitterness.
Royal Rose Real Sour Mix