Returned 5 result(s) for "Mint Leaves"; page 1 of 1.
Not to be confused with the single-word form of the “Southside”, the Chicago South Side is a similar variation that brings Angostura into the mix. Unlike the Southside, however, this cocktail calls for lime juice over lemon juice and London Dry Gin over American Gin.
Notes:
Lovely aromatic flavor of trade spices, gin botanicals and acidity. Just a great drink.
The east side, a play off the 'south side' cocktail and still remains a gin based drink.
Notes:
Great cucumber flavor with mild mint structure with just enough gin botanicals to keep it complex yet fun.
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A classic cocktail born out of Havana Cuba that has survived for almost one hundred years. This old classic is still requested at bars, pool parties and resorts.
Notes:
Light and refreshing sweet mint and sour lime bite with a light rum backend flavor.
The Southside cocktail has a murky history and a confusing origin city. Is “southside” referring to New York or Chicago? It has also been called “a mint julep with gin” and Dale Degroff says it’s a variation on a cocktail called the Major Bailey which uses both lemon and lime.
Notes:
A sour-forward gin flavored design with subtle mint flavor.
A century old recipe design, great for the warm months and easy because you can make up your ingredients. You can find recipes with similar ingredients dating back to Jerry Thomas’ 1862 How to Mix Drinks, or, The Bon Vivant’s Companion but not by name "Whiskey Smash."
Notes:
Warm buttery oak, citrus, mint, light touch of vanilla notes in the finish. Whiskey brand dictates profile.
Eli Mason Rich Simple Syrup