Returned 41 result(s) for "Gin"; page 3 of 3.
The Salty Dog was invented by George Jessel in 1952. George is the same individual that brought us the well known Bloody Mary cocktail. Given the date of the Salty Dog’s creation, we would not be surprised to find that the original called for vodka over gin.
Notes:
Light flavor of juniper and lightly tart fleshy grapefruit flavor.
The very first Singapore Sling recipe said to have been created by Ngiam Tong Boon is lost to time. Not even the Raffles Hotel, who has been serving it since 1915 or so, has the original recipe–they add “this or that” as Jeff Berry says in his book.
Notes:
Tropical flavors of almond, brown sugar, cherry, pineapple and an array of sweetness.
The "fizz" has existed since 1887 when Jerry Thomas penned his fizz recipes; one can technically turn anything into a fizz, even sloe berry gin, so here you go...a recipe dating to the 1880's with a spirit that matches it in age.
Notes:
Dry berry flavor, brown sugar with a light off-dry and tart finish.
This falls into the family of cocktails with the "slow comfortable screw" naming convention. When created with fresh orange juice, you've go a lovely lightly sweet breakfast cocktail, add galliano and you've got an "up against the wall" recipe.
Notes:
Taste like freshly squeezed orange juice with a twang of southern comfort sweetness.
The Southside cocktail has a murky history and a confusing origin city. Is “southside” referring to New York or Chicago? It has also been called “a mint julep with gin” and Dale Degroff says it’s a variation on a cocktail called the Major Bailey which uses both lemon and lime.
Notes:
A sour-forward gin flavored design with subtle mint flavor.
Suffering Bastard as designed in Cairo at Shepheard's by Joe Scialom in 1942. This is one of three variations of the suffering bastard series (the original). Follow on's include the dead and dying bastard.
Notes:
Light and refreshing zing of ginger with mellow island spice and muted alcohols.
This fantastic cocktail doesn’t have a rich deep history. We believe this was created (or at least documented) by Charles Phan’s Slanted Door.
Notes:
Floral forward herbal flavor, mid-palate citrus acidity, finishing of juniper, sweet herbaceous linger.
A cocktail born during prohibition at the Detroit Athletic Club, which could be a riff off the Corpse Reviver #2. While this drink is considered a prohibition cocktail, it was more than likely design prior to prohibition.
Notes:
A balanced herbal forward cocktail that doesn't lean towards sour, and has hints of sweetness.
A drink made famous by Ian Fleming in Casino Royale, another James Bond classic.
Notes:
Strong and direct gin with a hint of bitter bite; not for the weak at heart.
Jerry Thomas turned this prank cocktail into reality in 1876’s The Bar-Tenders Guide (page 91) in which Thomas references the Tom Collins as a Whiskey, Brandy or Gin cocktail by simply changing out the core ingredient in this sour.
Notes:
Refreshing yet sour start with a mildly sweet tart gin ending with bubbly citrus and a lingering sour lemon
This drink’s origin lands somewhere between 1919 and 1930 and has a few folks crediting themselves with its creation. Harry McElhone lays claim to its initial invention at London’s Ciro Club in 1919 while Harry Craddock documented it in his 1930’s Savoy Cocktail Book from the American Bar in London.
Notes:
Smooth timid start of citrus, growing juniper mid-palate mingled with lemon with a dry citrus finish.
Royal Rose Real Sour Mix