Returned 42 result(s) for "Fresh lemon juice"; page 1 of 3.
The 12 mile limit is a prohibition era cocktail that was named after the 12 mile distance at sea you had to be at to drink alcohol during the Volstead Act.
Notes:
Dry, sour citrus taste, a bit of rye without being too sweet. No real brandy impact seems to stand out.
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The Amaretto Sour is a highly requested cocktail made in a variation of ways; our way is the Jeffrey Morgenthaler design.
Notes:
Beautiful almond and oak flavor with an off-dry finish that lingers with amaretto.
Fruit brandy's have been popular for years, but usually they play a subtle role in a cocktail. The apricot sour plays a central role in this beverage.
Notes:
Starts sweet, ends off-dry and has a lovely mouth feel; well balanced and tasty.
The Aviation was created by Hugo Ensslin, head bartender at the Hotel Wallick in New York, in the early twentieth century. The first published recipe for the drink appeared in Ensslin's 1916 Recipes for Mixed Drinks.
Notes:
Approachable classic cocktail with complicated herbal notes, violet/flowery mid-palate which plays well against the juniper notes. In some ways, "tastes like purple."
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This 1950's classic has been made a dozen different ways with a dozen different ingredients, we've chosen one that fits our taste buds and generally accepted as flavorful and fun.
Notes:
A balance of sour against sweet coconut and pineapple juice with an alcoholic kick and nice coffee notes.
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The “Bees Knees” is prohibition-era slang for “the best” and this cocktail does bring out the best of honey and gin. The exact origin of this recipe is lost to history but as Jeffrey Morganthaler said, it appears in Trader Vic’s Bartenders Guide circa 1947 and called for the use of honey.
Notes:
Lemon Centric flavor profile, muted honey sweetness with gin botanicals.
The Bloody Mary’s original history isn’t very clear, but there have been a few folks that lay claim to its creation. Harry’s New York Bar in Paris believes they are the place the Bloody Mary was first invented in around 1921.
This cocktail is also documented in the 1931 publication Old Waldorf Bar Days by Albert Stevens Crockett (page 127). In this publication, the cocktail was designed as a rum-based recipe with a bit of grenadine.
Notes:
Raspberry sweetness mingled with floral juniper with a light dry citrus mid-palate that finishes sweet and silky with raspberries and gin.
The corpse reviver #2 is the second version of the corpse reviver and often considered the best version. Designed as a cure-all for a hangover. This rendition was born around 1871.
Notes:
An herbal sour bite that will wake you up with a bit of aromatic gin/juniper aroma with a bit of a fennel mid-palate flavor.
The idea of the decepticon is to deceive the drinkers eyes into thinking they're going to be sipping on a lemon drop...but they are not: this is a smoky mezcal number instead.
Notes:
A smokey citrus with undertone of maraschino liqueur
This cocktail was designed by Disaronno to promote their Cavalli partnership in which the Amaretto bottle was re-designed in the style of Roberto Cavalli.
Notes:
Sweet flavor of disaronno meets prosecco with a beautiful trade spice profile of bitters.
The east side, a play off the 'south side' cocktail and still remains a gin based drink.
Notes:
Great cucumber flavor with mild mint structure with just enough gin botanicals to keep it complex yet fun.
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A cocktail invented by Colin Nugent--what we need are more mezcal cocktails and this one brings some bitterness into the picture.
This WWI-era cocktail is what most would consider the Long Island Iced Tea of Tiki as designed by Trader Vic. Vic said this drink doesn't cut the fog as much as it creates one.
Notes:
Super sour with light sweet, and a vermouth-like sherry finish that may leave you shaking from the bite.
Some dedicated cocktail historians will tell you it was originally made with cognac over gin, but that’s still highly contested. Initially created at the New York Bar in Paris, the alcohol kick is like being shelled by a French 75mm field gun and thus you have “The French 75.”
Notes:
Citrus and sparkling wine beginning into a slight off-dry floral mid-palate finishing with a lingering sweet malty citrus.
Liber & Co Grenadine