Returned 7 result(s) for "Brandy / Cognac"; page 1 of 1.
The 12 mile limit is a prohibition era cocktail that was named after the 12 mile distance at sea you had to be at to drink alcohol during the Volstead Act.
Notes:
Dry, sour citrus taste, a bit of rye without being too sweet. No real brandy impact seems to stand out.
Filed In:
In 1959 he came up with a couple hangover remedies which he called Dying Bastard and Dead Bastard while working at the Marco Polo Club in Manhattan.
Notes:
Light/muted combination of bourbon and spicy ginger that remains light and refreshing. Not as bourbon-flavored as the dying bastard recipe.
In 1959 Joe Scialom came up with a couple hangover remedies which he called Dying Bastard and Dead Bastard while working at the Marco Polo Club in Manhattan. These would be variations to the suffering bastard.
Notes:
Great combination of bourbon and spicy ginger that remains light and refreshing while carrying a bit of alcohol.
This WWI-era cocktail is what most would consider the Long Island Iced Tea of Tiki as designed by Trader Vic. Vic said this drink doesn't cut the fog as much as it creates one.
Notes:
Super sour with light sweet, and a vermouth-like sherry finish that may leave you shaking from the bite.
The Scorpion or "Scorpion Bowl" for the full size, is one of Trader Vic's most popular cocktail recipes, from around 1972.
Notes:
A very generic "tiki drink", well balanced, good citrus to rum ratio that's not too sweet, not too dry. But, isn't memorable on complex flavors, good base for a new-aged tiki drink.
The first recipes for the Sidecar appear in 1922, in Harry MacElhone's Harry's ABC of Mixing Cocktails. It is one of six basic drinks listed in David A. Embury's The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks (1948). Ironically this recipe has a ton of variations, this is just one of them.
Notes:
A driving lemon and brandy/cognac forward flavor, with a mild sweet and a citrus sour. Not as much brandy as some recipe ratios propose.
Suffering Bastard as designed in Cairo at Shepheard's by Joe Scialom in 1942. This is one of three variations of the suffering bastard series (the original). Follow on's include the dead and dying bastard.
Notes:
Light and refreshing zing of ginger with mellow island spice and muted alcohols.
Liber & Co Grenadine