Returned 27 result(s) for "Angostura bitters"; page 1 of 2.
We couldn't find any history on this, but we guess the screwdriver nature is the use of orange juice combined with a core spirit (rum) to make an excellent flavored cocktail.
Notes:
Brown sugar, slight bitterness, allspice with a little rum flavor in the finish.
While there is no real history behind this drink, nor do we know whom created it, this cocktail came across our desk and we just had to make it.
Notes:
Dry and acidic, not too sweet, but all the flavors pair well together without anything overpowering; a bit of molasses/blackstrap, musty rye and hard to put down.
This cocktail works best in a barrel tiki mug because it fits the motif; This design is from the Mai Kai Restaurant, one of the Historic Places in Florida, best tiki bar in the world says some fans.
Notes:
Sweet and smooth passion fruit tartness with a mild sour and a good balance of sweet flavor, doesn't feel like four ounces of alcohol. Like a passion fruit lemonade.
We're not sure if this cocktail has any real relation to Betsy Ross and her friend Washington (and being the first to make the American Flag), but we have heard its first publishing was around 1941.
Notes:
A boozy number that combines flavors of cognac and port, leaning on the sweet side of potent alcohol-forward flavor. Look for dry curacao / orange liqueur to keep down the sweet notes.
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We found absolutely no reference to where this cocktail could have come from but we guess someone was playing with the concept of the pina colada and mai tai when working on this design.
Notes:
On the sweeter side, with lots of coconut and pina colada flavor with a warm rum finish.
A great new years even cocktail for those that want to experience champagne a bit differently from normal.
Notes:
Champagne forward with slight nuance of allspice, cinnamon and clove.
Not to be confused with the single-word form of the “Southside”, the Chicago South Side is a similar variation that brings Angostura into the mix. Unlike the Southside, however, this cocktail calls for lime juice over lemon juice and London Dry Gin over American Gin.
Notes:
Lovely aromatic flavor of trade spices, gin botanicals and acidity. Just a great drink.
In 1959 he came up with a couple hangover remedies which he called Dying Bastard and Dead Bastard while working at the Marco Polo Club in Manhattan.
Notes:
Light/muted combination of bourbon and spicy ginger that remains light and refreshing. Not as bourbon-flavored as the dying bastard recipe.
This cocktail was designed by Disaronno to promote their Cavalli partnership in which the Amaretto bottle was re-designed in the style of Roberto Cavalli.
Notes:
Sweet flavor of disaronno meets prosecco with a beautiful trade spice profile of bitters.
In 1959 Joe Scialom came up with a couple hangover remedies which he called Dying Bastard and Dead Bastard while working at the Marco Polo Club in Manhattan. These would be variations to the suffering bastard.
Notes:
Great combination of bourbon and spicy ginger that remains light and refreshing while carrying a bit of alcohol.
Another neighborhood cocktail with rye, that riff's off the manhattan and all those other manhattan variations, this cocktail brings "green" in the form of chartreuse
Notes:
Nice smooth rye flavor with a nuanced herbal sweetness and only a mild / slight vermouth finish.
The Krakatoa is no doubt some old tiki drink modified over the years, this cocktail is similar to one we've seen published by Jeff Berry, but without actual coffee included (circa 1960)
Notes:
Coffee notes right up front, citrus to follow with mingling clove; a tropical coffee beverage with interesting flavors.
The Luau cocktail was sent to us, seems a bit of research suggests mixologist Gerry Corcoran of PDT created it. We suggest creating this recipe with a good overproof rum, something too rich might be distracting and bacardi overproof is just bad, something in between would be great!
Notes:
Rich and tangy flavor, floral and full of flavors and a bit of finishing bite.
The Mai Tai is a forever fabulous and popular drink, this version brings the Orgeat and lime but does not match the exact Mai Tai recipe. This is a modification of a modification slightly tweaked (by us) to be less sweet.
The Nui Nui balances allspice, clove, cinnamon and other trade spices for a great introduction tiki drink for new and old cocktail enthusiasts.
Notes:
Flavorful balance of allspice, clove, and cinnamon, on the sweeter side of tiki.
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Berg & Hauck Jerry Thomas Bitters